Easily Operated

PhysiMax’s technology requires less time and effort than manual functional movement screening (FMS) methods. The process requires the trainees to perform simple but dynamic tests in front of the camera, with no special background, suits or wires connected to the body, providing immediate measurement and scores. It's as easy as 1-2-3.


 

Evidence-Based

PhysiMax reliably facilitates a selection of well-established dynamic movement test protocols that have been developed and proven by the world’s leading academies. These tests quantify biomechanical criteria such as symmetry, dynamic range of motion, motor control, stability, endurance and more. 



 

Sport Specific

PhysiMax’s technology is suitable for athletes that participate in team sports that require pivoting such as soccer, basketball, football, volleyball, baseball, track and field or even military training. Equipped by PhysiMax’s real-time analytics, trainers can create the proper workout regimens for injury prevention, treatment and performance optimization. The data is automatically uploaded and secured in the cloud for ongoing musculoskeletal athletes’ condition monitoring and future consultation.


 

Our Technology

PhysiMax employs portable technology to trainers with real-time results. PhysiMax has succeeded in demonstrating reliable and repetitive kinematic measurement and scoring by harnessing proprietary algorithms of full-body markerless dynamic motion tracking with unique computer vision and kinematic machine learning (EM) know-how.



Easily Operated

PhysiMax’s technology requires less time and effort than manual functional movement screening (FMS) methods. The process requires the trainees to perform simple but dynamic tests in front of the camera, with no special background, suits or wires connected to the body, providing immediate measurement and scores. It's as easy as 1-2-3.

Evidence-Based

PhysiMax reliably facilitates a selection of well-established dynamic movement test protocols that have been developed and proven by the world’s leading academies. These tests quantify biomechanical criteria such as symmetry, dynamic range of motion, motor control, stability, endurance and more. 

 

Sport Specific

PhysiMax’s technology is suitable for athletes that participate in team sports that require pivoting such as soccer, basketball, football, volleyball, baseball, track and field or even military training. Equipped by PhysiMax’s real-time analytics, trainers can create the proper workout regimens for injury prevention, treatment and performance optimization. The data is automatically uploaded and secured in the cloud for ongoing musculoskeletal athletes’ condition monitoring and future consultation.

 

Our Technology

 PhysiMax employs portable technology to trainers with real-time results. PhysiMax has succeeded in demonstrating reliable and repetitive kinematic measurement and scoring by harnessing proprietary algorithms of full-body markerless dynamic motion tracking with unique computer vision and kinematic machine learning (EM) know-how.

For more information on PhysiMax's solution, read below:

The risk of non-contact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in sport at both a professional and amateur level is high [3]. The majority of those injured who require surgery are under the age of 25 years old, mostly being high school, collegiate or league level athletes [4], and the athlete has to be off the field for up to 12 months. The majority of ACL tears are non-contact injuries with the mechanisms involving cutting, pivoting, accelerating, decelerating or landing from a jump [5,6]. Due to these mechanisms of injury, research has shown that it is possible to identify those at risk for injury and to intervene with corrective exercise to assist in decreasing the risk of non-contact injury [7,8]. Intervention that reduces the risk of injury and improves performance has been suggested to begin for players as young as 12 to 14 years old [9,10]. Injury prevention is critical to overall team success, as injuries, specifically the burden of muscle/tendon injuries to the lower limb, negatively affect a team’s performance [11]. A very skilled player who misses a high percentage of games through injury is not as valuable a player as one who is not injury prone.
An athlete that is at lower risk for injury is likely to have improved performance. By decreasing the amount of incorrect movements during biomechanical tasks, one is able to enhance the efficiency of the movement and thereby improve on-field performance of the athlete.
There is a need for clinically objective measures for quality of movement to mitigate the risk of secondary injuries. Using criterion-based return to play guidelines following ACL reconstructive surgery [13,14], it is recommended that athletes are tested frequently during their post-ACL reconstruction rehabilitation program to determine progression of rehabilitation and readiness to return to play [14]. Bizzini et al (2012) recommended the use of the valid and reliable Landing Error Scoring System (LESS) [15] to assess landing biomechanics and quality of movement in soccer players’ post-ACL reconstruction. Functional training is a key element in regaining neuromuscular control necessary to perform skills ranging from basic to soccer-specific drills (Bizzini M, 2012) Efficient and correct jump-landing biomechanics in basketball are an important functional component for neuromuscular training and prevention of ACL injuries. Waters (2012) [16] recommends that when returning to basketball post-ACL reconstruction an athlete should have an excellent LESS score. It is also important to assess the single-leg forward hop and single-leg lateral hop test on RTS. These enable the clinician to better determine how they should advance the athlete during their rehabilitation and make a more informed decision regarding return to sport.
1. Powers CM. The influence of abnormal hip mechanics on knee injury: a biomechanical perspective. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther.2010;40:42-51.
2. Bizzini M. Sensomotorische Rehabilitation nach Beinverletzungen. Mit Fallbeispielen in allen Heilungsstadien. Stuttgart, Germany: Thieme; 2000.
3. Baer GS, Harner CD. (2007) Clinical outcomes of allograft versus autograft in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Clin Sports Med;26:661-681.
4. Yu B, Kirkendall DT, Taft TN, Garrett WE Jr. (2002) Lower extremity motor control-related and other risk factors for noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injuries. Instr Course Lect;51:315-324.
5. Beynnon BD, Johnson RJ, Abate JA, Fleming BC, Nichols CE. Treatment of anterior cruciate ligament injuries, part I. Am J Sports Med 2005;33:1579-1602.
6. Shimokochi Y, Shultz SJ. Mechanisms of noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injury. J Athl Train 2008;43: 396-408.
7. Myer, G.D., Ford, K.R., Palumbo, J.P. and Hewett, T.E. (2005) Neuromuscular training improves performance and lower extremity biomechanics in female athletes. The Journal Strength and Conditioning Research 19, 51-60
8. Nyland, J., Brand E. and Fisher B. (2010) Update on rehabilitation following ACL reconstruction. Open Access Journal of Sports Medicine 1, 153-160
9. Froholdt A, Olsen OE, Bahr R (2009) Low risk of injuries among children playing organized soccer: a prospective cohort study. Am J Sports Med; Jun,37(6):1155-60
10. Myklebust G and Steffen K. (2009) Prevention of ACL injuries: how, when and who? Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc:17:857–858
11. Hägglund M, Walden M, Magnusson H, Kristenson K, Bengtsson H and Ekstrand J. (2013) Injuries affect team performance negatively in professional football: an 11-year follow-up of the UEFA Champions League injury study. Br J Sports Med;47:738– 2.
12. Orchard JW. (2009) On the value of team medical staff: can the “Moneyball” approach be applied to injuries in professional football? Br J Sports Med;43:963–5.
13. Myer G, Schmitt L, Brent J, Ford K, Barber Foss K, Scherer B, Heidt R, Divine J and Hewett T. Utilization of Modified NFL Combine Testing to Identify Functional Deficits in Athletes Following ACL Reconstruction. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 2011 June ; 41(6): 377–387.
14. Bizzini M, Hancock D and Impellizzer F (2012) Suggestions from the field for return to sports participation following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: Soccer. Journal of Orthopaedics and Sports Physical Therapy. April 2012, 42(4).
15. Padua D, Boling M, DiStefano L, Onate J, Beutler A, and Marshall S. (2011) Reliability of the Landing Error Scoring System- Real Time, a Clinical Assessment Tool of Jump- Landing Biomechanics. Journal of Sport Rehabilitation. 20:145-156
16. Waters , E. (2012) Suggestions From the Field for Return to Sports Participation Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Basketball. Journal of Orthopaedics and Sports Physical Therapy. April 2012, 42(4).